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35th Anniversary 1972-2007 




EIERA 



Chairman s /letter 




On Dec. 1, 1971, a state representative from St. Louis pre- filed House Bill 1041. In 1972, the bill passed 
creating the Environmental Improvement Authority (EIA). The EIA issued its first bonds in 1973. 

In 1983, the legislature expanded the EIA's responsibilities and it was renamed the Environmental 
Improvement and Energy Resources Authority (EIERA). Also, the EIERA was transferred to the 
Missouri Department of Natural Resources. 

In 1992, the Authority released the nationally recognized Missouri Statewide Energy Study. This seven- 
volume, 900-page report listed eight initiatives and 39 recommendations, including more fuel-efficient 
cars, greater use of mass transit, and more energy-efficient buildings. One outcome of this in-depth 
study was the development of the Missouri Energy Efficiency Leveraged Loan Program. In just a few 
years, this program has provided more than $33 million for energy improvements in 85 local schools 
and public buildings. 

Additionally, the EIERA has provided more than $5 billion in environmental financing, mainly for 
construction improvements for wastewater treatment plants and drinking water facilities. Since 
1991, the Market Development Program has provided $7.2 million to Missouri businesses to create 
recycled-content products, and those businesses have created more than 350 new jobs. The Brownfields 
Revolving Loan Fund provides economic development opportunities for rural and urban communities. 

The Authority is proud to celebrate its 35th anniversary, but we will not rest on our accomplishments. 
The board and staff will continue to work diligently to develop innovative financing programs and 
products that bring low-cost environmental services to Missouri citizens. 



Sincerely, 



Jerome J Govero, RE. 
Chairman 



^ffi Anniverm 



3972-2007 



Tafafe of Content 





D 

22 




Air Bags... The Sole Connection 



Water Plant Completes a $1.8 Million Renovation 




Brown.elds - Building Communities, Careers. 




Reading, Riding and Arithmetic. 



Editorial Staff: 

Writing, editing, and printing services were coordinated by Kenneth Seeney, 
Missouri Environmental Improvement and Energy Resources Authority. 

Photography: 

Photographs were provided by Kenneth Seeney, EIERA, Jefferson City; Karen 
Massey, EIERA; Scott Myers, Missouri Department of Natural Resources, 
Jefferson City; Mike Cooper, Cooper's Landing, Boone County; and Rick Steagall, 
Lee's Summit R-VII School District, Lee's Summit. 

Front Cover: 

A light-rail train crosses over a busy section of I-70 as cars and trucks scurry to 
destinations, near and tar. . ... 

In 1992, the ElERA's nationally acclaimed, 18-month energy study provided eight 
initiatives and 39 recommendations for energy conservation in Missouri. Three of 
those recommendations emphasized greater use of trains and mass transit, more 
energy-ef.cient buildings and more fuel-ef.cient cars. 

Legal Counsel: 

Beverly Marcin 
Lewis, Rice & Fingersh 
500 N. Broadway, 
Suite 2000 
St. Louis, Missouri 63102 



Report Summary - 

1 Chairman's Letter 

2 Members of the Authority 

3 The EIERA - Its History and Mission 

4 The Year in Review 

5 1 972 to 2007 - "The Road to a Better Environment" 

8 People Who Live in Glass Houses 

9 Market Development Program - Financial Summary 

12 SRF Projects Financed in Fiscal Year 2007 

13 Projects Financed through Bond Issuances, 1973-2007 
20 Summary of Bond Issuances 



^[s^wKL Ths annual report is printed on recycled paper. { 



The 2007 Annual Report of the Environmental 
Improvement and Energy Resources Authority 
(EIERA), is a public record of the programs 

administered during fiscal year July 1, 2006, 
through June 30, 2007. 

EIERA 

Post Office Box 744 
J efferson City, Missouri 65102 
(573) 751-4919 
Fax: (573)635-3486 
Web site: www.dnr.mo.gov/eiera 



TAemkers off fie Authority 



Jerome (Jerry) Govero, RE., Chairman 

Jerry Govero was appointed to a two year term by Gov. Bob Holden. He is a developer and engineer for Govero Land Services in Imperial and has 
been involved in the planning and development of more than 10 residential communities. Also, he was a management consultant for Bloomsdale 
Excavating Company, Bloomsdale, and worked as an engineer for Armour Agriculture Company in Crystal City. Govero served as a fi rst lieutenant 
in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers as a combat engineer. 

Govero, who earned a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Missouri, Rolla, is a member of the Missouri Society of 
Professional Engineers. He is a member of the Greater St. Louis Jaguar Association, the Festus Board of Appeals, and Building Officials and Code 
Administrators (BOCA). He is the former president of the Parish Council of Our Lady Church, Festus, and served as board president of the PONY 
BIRD Home, Inc. Also, Govero is the former president of the Show Me Antique Car Club. 



Ryan Doyle, P.E., Vice Chairman 

Ryan Doyle was appointed to the Authority for a three-year term by Gov. Matt Blunt. He is currently a safety engineer at ATK at the Lake City 
Ammunition Plant. 

Prior to joining ATK, Doyle was an environmental and safety engineer at Pittsburgh Corning in Sedalia. Also, he served one year as a field engineer 
at Schlumberger Oil Field Services in Abilene, Texas. 

In 2001, Doyle earned a Bachelor of Science degree in chemical engineering from the University of Kansas and is a certified Professional Engineer. 
He is married and lives in Lee's Summit. 



Deron Cherry, Treasurer 

Deron Cherry, reappointed to a second term by Gov. Matt Blunt, is a Kansas City businessman and former NFL star. Cherry is managing general 
partner of United Beverage Company, an Anheuser-Busch distributor in Kansas City. He is a minority owner for the NFL's Jacksonville Jaguars 
football team. 

A six-time All-Pro safety, Cherry was considered one of the best players in Kansas City Chiefs history. He was named to the All NFL Decade Team 
in the 1980s and is a member of the Kansas City Chiefs Hall of Fame. Known for his bone-jarring tackles, his 50 career interceptions ranks third 
in club history. In 1988, he received the NFL Players Association's highest honor, The Byron White Humanitarian Award for service to his team, 
community, and country. 

Cherry, who graduated from Rutgers University with a Bachelor of Science degree in biology, has been a spokesman and fundraiser for several non- 
profit organizations. He is the founder of Scorel for Health, a program that provides health screenings for more than 12,000 children in the Kansas 
City metropolitan area. Also, he is co-chairman of the Jazz District Redevelopment Corporation and serves on the Kansas City Sports Commission 
and the Kansas City Liquor Advisory Committee. Recently, he was selected by Gov. Blunt to serve on the Jackson County Sports Authority. 



Darwin Hindman, Member 

Gov. Bob Holden appointed Darwin Hindman to a two-year term on the Authority. In 1995, Hindman was elected mayor of Columbia and is serving 
his fifth term. Also, Hindman practices law at the Columbia firm of Hindman and Goldstein, LLC. 

Very active in the community, Hindman is president of the Missouri Rails to Trails Foundation and is a former member of the Missouri Development 
Finance Board and the Missouri State Parks Advisory Board. 

Mayor Hindman earned his bachelor and law degrees from the University of Missouri, Columbia, and served two tours of active duty as an Air Force 
pilot. He has been honored on numerous occasions including the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Memorial Association award, Citizen of the Year 
citation, Columbia Chamber of Commerce, and Chevron-Times Mirror Publication's Citizen Conservation award. 



Robt C Kramer, Secretary 

In 2007, Robt C Kramer was appointed to the Authority for a three-year term by Gov. Matt Blunt. A corporate executive and businessman for more 
than 25 years, Kramer worked five years as a management consultant based in Chicago. He worked five years at Citicorp, focusing on fi rst and second 
mortgage loan processing. At Mercantile Bank, St. Louis, he was involved in planning and marketing and credit card recovery. For 10 years, Kramer 
was self-employed in the distribution and delivery service. 

A native Missourian, Kramer owns a 57-acre farm near Gerald in Franklin County. He enjoys bird watching and taking photographs of flowers. He 
has been married to his wife, Ellen, for 40 years and they live in St. Louis. The Kramers have two daughters and four grandchildren (two boys and 
two girls). 



3972-2007 



Tfie TzOTzl&l ~ Ots History and TAission 



The Environmental Improvement and 
Energy Resources Authority (EIERA) is 
an independent, self-supporting agency 
created in 1972 by the state legislature. The 
EIERA's mandate is to protect Missouri's 
environment, develop energy alternatives, 
and promote economic development. The 
Authority's mandate includes .nancing 
projects and providing technical assistance. 

The EIERA is not a regulatory 
agency. The Authority operates as a quasi- 
governmental agency and receives no State 
general revenues for its operation. The 
agency operates on fees received for issuing 
bonds. However, in 1972, the EIERA 
did receive a one-time appropriation of 
$225,000 from the General Assembly. Over 
the years, these monies have been leveraged 
into $5.1 billion for environmental 
financing. 

The governor appoints the five members 
of the Authority's board for three-year 
terms. Board members have experience in 
law, finance, and environmental affairs. A 
director and seven staff members conduct 
the day-to-day activities. 




In 1992, the Authority released the seven-volume, 900-page energy study, 
the .rst extensive report on trends and patterns related to Missouri's energy 
consumption. Fifteen years ago, Missourians spent 11 cents of every dollar on 
energy needs, but in 2005, they spent 12 cents of every dollar for energy. This 
increase reflects the rising costs of gasoline (cars), home heating fuel, and 
other energy resources. 



Since 1973, the EIERA has been recognized as 
an extremely important financing agency. The EIERA 
issues several types of traditional tax exempt and taxable 
notes and bonds which are regulated by state and federal 
laws. The structure of EIERA financings and assistance 
have varied greatly and are dependent upon the uses and 
repayment sources of the projects. The nature and size 
of the projects as well as current federal and state laws 
must be considered by the EIERA board and staff when 
requests for financing are reviewed. 

In addition to bond and note financings, the EIERA 
can provide smaller projects with financial assistance. 
The EIERA continues to develop alternative financing 
methods to assist environmental improvement and 
energy projects. In terms of energy projects, the 
Missouri Energy Efficiency Leveraged Loan Program is 
regarded as the first of its type in the nation. Developed 
in 2000 by EIERA staff and the Department of Natural 
Resource's Energy Center, this program provides low- 
cost financing to increase energy efficiency in Missouri 
schools and public buildings. 



In 1990, the State Revolving Fund (SRF) was 
developed by EIERA, the Clean Water Commission, 
Department of Natural Resources, and U.S. 
Environmental Protection Agency. One of the highest 
rated SRFs in the nation, this program provides low- 
cost loans to communities and districts for construction 
of wastewater and sewage treatment plants. In 
1997, a drinking water SRF was developed to assist 
communities in their efforts to upgrade public drinking 
water systems and facilities. Also, with this expansion, 
the Safe Drinking Water Commission was incorporated 
into the program. 

In 1992, the Missouri General Assembly 
established the Missouri Market Development Program 
to develop and promote markets for recycled content 
products. The EIERA administers the program and 
receives assistance through an inter-agency steering 
committee composed of staff at the Department of 
Natural Resources and the Department of Economic 
Development. The steering committee reviews 
applications and the Authority's board of directors 
approves all projects. 



EIERA 



2007 Annual Hehort 



The year in tyview 



In 1992, the Authority released the seven- 
volume, 900-page Missouri State Energy Study. This 
nationally acclaimed report was the fi rst in-depth 
review of trends and patterns related to statewide 
energy use. One outcome of the study was the 
development of the Missouri Energy Efficiency 
Leveraged Loan Program. Since 2000, the loan 
program has provided $26.4 million to more than 70 
public school projects and $6.5 million to 15 local 
governments to install energy efficient lights and 
equipment. 

This year, the Brownfields Revolving Loan 
Program provided $30,000 to a St. Louis community 
development organization to cleanup a one-acre site, 
which will allow construction of affordable housing. 
Several years ago, there was a gasoline station on the 
site. This low-cost loan program is in its second year. 

In 2007, the Authority issued more than 
$79.4 million in State Revolving Fund bonds for 
wastewater and drinking water projects. The Market 
Development Program, which promotes markets for 
recycled-content products, provided $426,000 in 
project assistance and more than $65,000 in technical 
assistance. 

Staff Activities 

The EIERA staff provides support to other 
organizations that promote environmental protection or 




The EIERA is a charter member of the Council of Infrastructure Financing 
Authorities (CIFA). Throughout the year, and at its annual conference 
(shown above), CIFA promotes innovative debt financing strategies to 
ensure public access to affordable infrastructure improvements, such as 
construction of wastewater treatment plants. 



environmental financing initiatives. 

Council of Infrastructure Financing Authorities 

Based in Washington, D.C., the Council of 
Infrastructure Financing Authorities (CIFA) was 
established in the 1980s. CIFA has members in 44 
states and is administered by an executive director and 
four officers (president, vice president, secretary, and 
treasurer). The EIERA is a charter member of CIFA 
and Tom Welch, director, and Karen Massey, deputy 
director, are the EIERA representatives. 

CIFA is a major voice in advancing innovative 
debt financing techniques to ensure public access to 
affordable infrastructure improvements. It harnesses 
the resources of federal, state and local governments to 
serve the environmental needs of the general public. 

Missouri Recycling Association 

The Missouri Recycling Association (MORA) is a 
statewide not-for-profit organization that is administered 
by a 12-member board. Staff member Kristin Allan- 
Tipton is a former president of MORA. 

MORA goals support waste reduction and recycling 
by providing information, educational opportunities, 
and technical assistance. The 200-member organization 
sponsors an annual conference and supports other 
environmental conferences and seminars. The group 
publishes a quarterly newsletter and is an af fi I i ate of the 
National Recycling Coalition. 



Missouri Waste Control Coalition 

The Missouri Waste Control Coalition 
(MWCC) is 300-member not-for-profit 
organization. The statewide organization 
is a coalition of citizens, companies and 
organizations who are concerned about the 
environment and the proper management and 
disposal of generated wastes. 

Annually, the MWCC sponsors the Missouri 
Waste Management Conference, a conference 
that has run continuously since 1972, making 
it one of the oldest environmental conferences 
in the nation. Also, the MWCC publishes three 
newsletters per year and annually sponsors an 
awards program, teacher grant program, and an 
internship program for college students. Staff 
member Kenneth Seeney is a former president 
of the MWCC and a former board member 
of the National Recycling Coalition. Kristin 
Allan-Tipton is past president of the coalition. 



1972: House Bill 1041 
creates the EIA 



1982: More than $900 million 
in bond financings 



1985: Released 
Missouri Hazardous 
Waste Study 



1987: Released 
Missouri Resource 
Recovery Study 



OAD 

n T0A BETTER 

J ENVIRONMENT 

EIERA MILESTONES 1972-2007 




1991: Established 
Missouri Market 
Development Program 



1992: Released Missouri 
State Energy Study 



1997: More than $3 billion 
in bond financings 



1990: Established State 
Revolving Fund, 
Wastewater 




1991: More than $2 billion 
in bond financings 



1997: Established SRF, 
Drinking Water Program 



2000: Established the 
Missouri Energy Efficiency 
Leveraged Loan Program 



2002: Exceeds $4 billion in 
bond financings 




2006: Energy Loan Program 
assistance tops 
$32 million statewide 



2006: Provided $30,000 to a 
St. Louis community organization 
to clean up a brownfields site 



2007: SRF tops $1 .6 billion in bond 
financings and SRF loan savings to 
Missouri citizens and communities 
exceeds $541 million 



2007: $7.2 million in assistance statewide 
from Market Development Program and during 
the past eight years, more than 350 jobs were 
created by companies receiving market 
development assistance 




JAarfet flevefopmenf "Program 



Air Bags... The Sole Connection 



The next time you are running on the treadmill 
at that fitness center or jogging in the park in your 
comfortable tennis shoes, you may want to thank a 
company in St. Charles. 

Nike IHM (In House Manufacturing, Inc.) employs 
350 workers at its plant on the western border of 
St. Charles, about 20 miles south of the St. Louis 
Lambert Airport. Nike IHM makes the "air bags" that 
are inserted into the sole of Nike tennis shoes, running 
shoes and other athletic footwear. You can actually see 
the air bags through a "window" in the rear sole of the 
shoe. 

"Our company is the sole supplier to Nike, Inc. 
for airbags used in Nike's footwear cushioning 
products," said Ron Weiss, general manager. "These 
shoes are worn by some of the world's top athletes." 



Also, the company manufactures several other 
products from recycled plastic. The lumbar seating 
cushion in your car most likely includes plastic 
made at this facility. The Nike plant is located in 
Misssouri Research Park, a 190-acre industrial 
complex, owned and operated by the University of 

( Continued on page 7) 

By collecting and reusing 
plastic scrap in the production 
of the air bags, this facility is 
able to divert 425 tons of 
plastic each year from 
area land.lls. 

-Nike IHM 




*fith Anniverm 



3972-2007 



TAarfef Uevefopment Program 



Missouri. Also, Research 
Park is home for 17 
other businesses and two 
government agencies. 

In .seal year 2006, 
Nike IHM received 
$50,000 in assistance 
from the Missouri 
Market Development 
Program to purchase 
a granulator. The 
granulator, nicknamed 
"Grindasaurus-Rex," 
weighs 2,300 pounds 
and is seven feet tall. It 
can grind 2,000 pounds 
of plastic per hour and 
operates 24 hours a day, 
seven days a week. 




"Rex" will re-grind 
scrap plastic into "pellets" 
that will be used to make 
new plastic-content 
products. Each year, by 

reusing scrap plastic in the manufacturing process, 
the company will divert 425 tons of plastic scrap 
that might have been headed to a landfill. 

"This company collects scrap plastic during 
the production process and reuses that same plastic 



Nike IHM received $50,000 from the Missouri Market Development Program to purchase this 
granulator. Nicknamed "Grindasaurus-Rex, " it weighs 2,300 pounds and is seven feet tall. 
The granulator can grind 2,000 pounds of plastic per hour and operates 24 hours a day, seven 
days a week. 



441 



'Recycling saves energy, 
electricity, and valuable 
natural resources, which 
supports the community and 
the local economy. 5 

-Robt Kramer 
Secretary of the Authority 



55 



in the manufacture of new products," said board 
secretary Robt Kramer. "Recycling saves energy, 
electricity, and valuable natural resources, which 
supports the community and the local economy." 

In fiscal year 2007, the Market Development 
Program provided financial assistance to 10 
businesses and projects statewide in the amount 
of $426,480. Also, the program provided $65,350 
in technical assistance to 16 projects for product 
research. 

Since the Market Development Program was 
established in 1990, more than $7.2 million has been 
awarded to 250 businesses and companies. Since 
1999, more than 350 new jobs have been created by 
the companies that recieved financial assistance. 



EIERA 



2007 Annual Hehort 



JAarfet flevefopmenf "Program 



People Who Live in Glass Houses.... 



If you have friends who live in glass houses. . ..Linda 
Kimrey would like to stop by and visit with them. Linda 
loves to collect glass. Lots of glass. 

Kimrey is executive director of Laclede Industries, 
Inc., a sheltered workshop that sits on four acres in 
Lebanon. "We provide individuals with disabilities 
dignified employment - when larger companies turn 
them away," said Kimrey, who began working at Laclede 
in 2006. Laclede employs more than 50 people and has 
nine staff members. 

In addition to visiting businesses and residences in 
Camden, Laclede, Miller, and Morgan counties, Kimrey 
has 24-hour drop-off receptacles at Maplecrest and 
Boswell Elementary Schools and at their main office in 
Lebanon. During a good week, she collects or receives 
about 4,000 pounds of glass. 



After raising $10,000 
through contributions 
and fundraising projects, 
Kimrey applied for and 
received $49,287 in financial 
assistance from the Missouri 
Market Development 
Program. She used the 
money to purchase a 
4,600-pound glass crusher 
from Glen DeHart & Sons, 
Inc., in C hesterfield. The big 
blue machine can grind glass 
at the rate of 20 tons per 
hour and separate glass into 
sand-like particles or 3/8" 
pebbles. 

"It cost approximately 
$11,000 to ship the 
crusher and the crusher's 
accessories from St. Louis 
to Lebanon," Kimrey said. 



Kimrey plans to market bags of crushed glass to 
crafts stores, "Dollar Stores," and other commercial 
outlets in Lebanon and throughout south-central 
Missouri. Also, David Willard, of Willard Asphalt and 
Quarries, has agreed to take her crushed glass and use 
it in construction projects. The City of Lebanon will 
use crushed glass in pipe-laying projects. 

The Market Development Program was established 
in 1991 by the General Assembly in an effort to 
conserve landfill space and to encourage economic 
development initiatives that would energize the 
recycling industry. "Missouri was one of the fi rst 
states in the nation to operate an assistance program to 
create recycled content products for the marketplace," 
said board member Darwin Hindman. 




Laclede Industries, Inc., a sheltered workshop in Lebanon, received $49,287 from the Market 
Development Program to purchase a glass crusher. The big blue glass crusher weighs 4,600 
pounds and can grind 20 tons of glass per hour. The crusher was purchased from a St. Louis- 
area company and cost $11,000 to ship it to Lebanon from St. Louis. 



*fith Anniverm 



3972-2007 



JAarfet flevefopmenf Program 



Financial Assistance Projects 






Fiscal Year 2007 






Company 


Materials 


Location 


Amount 


Customix Corp./Aggieville US 


Food Waste 


Marsh, eld 


$23,317.00 


Sunshine Recycling/Central Paper 


Plastics 


St. Louis 


$42,000.00 


DCAL Services, LLC 


Electronic scrap 


St. Louis 


$39,000.00 


RAMM Enterprises, Inc. 


Mattresses 


Garden City 


$50,000.00 


Plastic Lumber Company of America, LLC Plastics 


St. Louis 


$50,000.00 


Laclede Industries, Inc. 


Glass 


Lebanon 


$49,2o7. 00 


Wahlco/D-WTool, Inc. 


Plastics 


Jackson 


$50,000.00 


Bart Menning Tree Service, LLC 


C&D waste 


Columbia 


$50,000.00 


Coon Manufacturing, Inc. 


Plastics 


Spickard 


$22,876.77 


Mountain Vue Enterprises, LLC 


Wood 


Mountain View 


$50 000 00 








Total $426,480.77 


Technical Assistance Projects 






Fiscal Year 2007 






Company 


Materials 


Location 


Amount 


Strategic Materials, Inc. 


Glass 


St. Louis 


$3,500.00 


Midwest Recycling Center 


E-Waste 


Barnhart 


$5,000.00 


Wisdom Roofing 


Asphalt Shingles 


Rolla 


$3,000.00 


Jefferson Asphalt Company 


Asphalt Shingles 


Rolla 


$2,000.00 


EPC 


E-Waste 


St. Charles 


$4,950.00 


Enginuity, LLC 


Plastic 


Hartville 


$2,200.00 


For Your Convenience 


Polystyrene 


Rolla 


$3,800.00 


Reed Rubber, Inc. 


Rubber 


St. Louis 


$4,500.00 


Murl Havens 


Waste Poly Product 


Hillsboro 


$1,500.00 


Missouri Tie & Timber 


Waste Wood 


Reynolds 


$6,500.00 


Wisdom Roofing 


Asphalt Shingles 


Rolla 


ch f r\r\f\ f\f\ 

$6,000.00 


Ott Food Products 


Food Waste 


Carthage 


<D A O AA AA 

$4,200.00 


Smithville Custom Cabinets 


Wood Waste 


Smithville 


$3,000.00 


Exide Technologies 


Calcium Sulfate 


Forest City 


$4,200.00 


NorthStar Group 


Powder Paint 


Monett 


$5,000.00 


Central Missouri Poultry Producers 


Poultry Waste 


California 


$6,000.00 








Total $65,350.00 




Kirksville Water Plant Completes a $1.8 Million Renovation 



Potter Avenue in Kirksville was not named after the 
magical movie character Harry Potter. 

However, Potter Avenue will take you to the front 
door of the Kirksville Water Purification Plant. And 
there is no magical formula for purifying the drinking 
water for the city's 17,000 residents and several 
surrounding communities. Just ask the mayor. 

"We have dedicated employees over there, good 
managers and the best technology available," said 
Mayor Jeff Newton. "In turn, we provide high quality 
water services for our citizens and the business 
community." Mayor Newton added that the plant, 
which employs eight workers, processes 4.5 million 
gallons of water per day. 

In 2006, Kirksville officials received a $1.8 million 
loan from the State Revolving Fund (SRF) to upgrade 
equipment at the water plant. After several months of 
construction, city officials completed a facelift of the 
exterior of the building and installed energy-efficient 
lights, a furnace, high efficiency water pumps, and 
filters. 

However, these filters are nothing like your "filters" 
at home. "No, these fi Iters are 27 x 22 (feet) and 10 to 
1 5 feet deep and consist of several layers of sand and 
rock," said Brian Carter, plant manager. Several times 
during the year, Carter conducts tours of the plant for 
school children. 

Plant officials explained that water is pumped 
through 24-inch pipes from two sources for purification. 
Forrest Lake, which is 640 acres, is four miles from the 
plant. Hazel Creek Lake is 560 acres and about seven 
miles from the plant. At Hazel Creek Lake, water is 
pumped to the purification plant at the rate of 2,250 
gallons per minute. Also, if there is a power outage 
caused by an ice storm or thunderstorm, officials have 




The Kirksville Water Plant, which employs eight workers, 
received a $1.8 million loan from the State Revolving Fund. 
The .nancial assistance provided equipment upgrades as well 
as construction improvements to the exterior and interior areas 
of the building. The plant serves Kirksville and several nearby 
communities. 

a mobile generator they can transport to either of the 
lake sites. 

The plant, which sits on eight acres, has three silos 
that hold 44,000 pounds. One silo is fi I led with carbon, 
one with alum, and the third with lime. In addition to the 



( Continued on page 11 ) 



*fith Anniverm 



3972-2007 



State tyvofvinq ^und 



large .Iters and settling pools, these silos are important 
because, at various stages, water is pumped through the 
silos during the treatment and purification process. 

"Kirksville is just one of several communities 
across the state that has opted to upgrade plant 
equipment and thereby improve services to its 
customers," said Ryan Doyle, vice chairman of the 
Authority. "Also, city officials saved rate payers a 
considerable amount of money by using the State 
Revolving Fund." 

In 1997, the SRF Drinking Water Program was 
established to assist communities and districts to 
purchase new equipment or make construction 
improvements to plant facilities. In fiscal year 2007, 
$14 million was loaned to seven communities or public 
water districts. 

"Since 1997, more than $225 million has been 
loaned to 60 communities and water districts across the 



state," Doyle said. "During that 10-year period, local 
governments and districts realized a total savings that 
exceeded $51 million." 

The SRF Wastewater Program was established in 
1990 and provides low-cost loans for improvement to 
wastewater treatment facilities. In fiscal year 2007, 
$65.4 million was loaned to 12 communities and sewer 
districts for system improvements and upgrades. 



"During that 10-year period, 
local governments and districts 
realized a total savings that 
exceeded $51 million." 

-Ryan Doyle 
Vice Chairman of the Authority 



In addition to large. Iters 
and other equipment, 
the green-colored high- 
efficiency pump pictured 
here (right) were some of 
the equipment upgrades 
that were purchased 
through a low-cost loan 
from the State Revolv- 
ing Fund (SRF) In fis- 
cal year 2007, the SRF 
awarded $14 million to 
seven communtities or 
public water districts to 
support system improve- 
ments. 




EIERA 



ZOO J Annua f Report 



> financed in fiscal year ZOO J 



State Revolving Fund 



Clean Water Projects Drinking Water Projects 



Participant 


Amount 


Participant 


Amount 


Ashland 


$1,000,000 


Clay County PWS District #3 


$2,295,000 


Boone County Regional Sewer District 


$675,000 


Ironton 


$2,500,000 


Columbia 


$915,000 


Kirksville 


$3,500,000 


Greenfield 


$210,000 


Linn 


$2,000,000 


Osage Beach 


$2,550,000 


Metropolitan Sewer District, St. Louis 


$14,205,000 


Richland 


$1,000,000 


Ozark 


$15,125,000 


Seneca 


$835,000 


Raytown 


$5,495,000 


Washburn 


$1,420,000 


Rolla 


$3,005,000 






Springfield 


$7,855,000 






Warrensburg 


$14,150,000 






Weston 


$800,000 






Total 


$65,435,000 


Total 


$14,100,000 




Instead of bicycle riders 
and tourists, .ood wa- 
ters rush down the Katy 
Trail State Park, about 
one mile north of Eas- 
ley in Boone County. In 
addition to state parks, 
spring flood waters, in 
2007, impacted the oper- 
ation of public drinking 
water plants, wastewater 
treatment facilities, and 
landfills located near the 
Missouri River. 




*fith Anniverm 



3972-2007 



Projects financed Tfiroucjfi "Bond issuances 



Project Location Amount Financed 



1973 


St . Inp MinpralQ Onrnnratinn 


Hptpi ilanpi im 

1 ICI UUIal ICUII 1 






7 000 000 








TOTAL: 




7 000 000 


1974 


Union Electric Company 


St. Louis 




$ 


16,500,000 








TOTAL: 


s 


1 6 500 000 


1975 


Mohav Chpmical Cornoration 


Kan^a^ Citv 

i\ai i olio \_/iiy 






7 ^00 000 




Alnha Portland Inducitripci Inr 


Rt 1 nui<5 






1 900 000 




Union Electric Company 


St. Louis 




$ 


22,000,000 




Mobay Chemical Corporation 


Kansas City 




$ 


3,500,000 




Amco Corooration 


Kansas Citv 




$ 


1 23 350 000 

1 t-U]OOU(UUU 








TOTAL: 


S 


1 58 250 000 


1976 


NInranda Aluminum Plnmnanv 


Mpw Madrid 

imcvv iviauiiu 






1 ^00 000 




Ampriran Cvanamid Dnmnanv 


Hannihal 

1 ICll 1 1 1 1 UJCL 1 






q ipn 000 








TOTAL: 




19 620 000 


1977 


Standard Oil (AMOCO) Company 


Kansas City 




$ 


6,450,000 




Qrpat 1 akpci Carhon finrnnratinn 


St L ouk 






7 000 000 




Kansas Citv Power & Lioht Comoanv 


Kansas Citv 






20 000 000 




Union Flpotric Comnanv 


St Louis 






27 08 S 000 








TOTAL: 


$ 


60 535 000 


1978 


Mobay Chemical Corporation 


Kansas City 




$ 


1 1 ,000,000 




Mnhav nhpmiral Onrnnratinn 

iviKjuay i ici i iiocm i uui ci li w 1 1 


Kan^aQ f^itv 

i \a, i iouo wily 






aoR noo 




Kan^aQ f^itv Pnwpr A 1 inht 

f \c* i louo wily t uvvci ot i_ I y I 1 1 


iycu iouo wily 






Qi 000 000 




fniilf - M/pQtprn f ndi icitripQ Inr* 

WIUII VVCOlCI 1 1 1 1 IVJUOll ICO; II IO. 


Panp t^Sir'a rdpai i 
wd|jc uiiaiucdu 






1 1 000 000 




Monsanto Comnanv 


St Louis 






2 370 000 




Fmnirp Di^trirt Flpftrir Onmnanv 

1 — 1 1 IL/1 1 C 1— / lOLI lOl L— 1 v7vs LI 11^ VUI 1 IL/QI ly 


KanQaQ fiitv 

r\dl lOClo wily 






8 000 000 








TOTAL- 




64 000 


1979 


Monsanto Comnanv 


St Louis 






10 250 000 




Mobay Chemical Company 


Kansas City 




$ 


11,000,000 




American Cyanamid 


Hannibal 




$ 


3,700,000 




Monsanto Hnmnanw /Ouppnv Plants 

lvlv/1 IOCII 1 LU V/UI 1 ILJGll ly IVxUCCI iy 1 ICll 1 L F 


St 1 mite 






? 900 000 








TOTAL: 




27 850 000 


1980 


Associated Electric Cooperative, Inc. 


Thomas Hill 




$ 


95,000,000 




Alpha Portland Industries, Inc. 


St. Louis 




$ 


1,450,000 




River Cement Company 


Festus 




$ 


5,700,000 




Standard Oil (AMOCO) Company 


Kansas City 




$ 


8,300,000 




Great Lakes Container Corporation 


St. Louis 




$ 


800,000 




Union Electric Company 


St. Louis 




$ 


60,000,000 




American Cyanamid Company 


Hannibal 




$ 


3,450,000 




St. Joseph Light & Power Company 


St. Joseph 




$ 


5,300,000 








TOTAL: 


$ 


180,000,000 


1981 


Associated Electric Cooperative, Inc. 


New Madrid 




$ 


36,000,000 




City of Wentzville (GM Plant) 


Wentzville 




$ 


6,350,000 




Union Electric Company 


St. Louis 




$ 


45,000,000 








TOTAL: 


$ 


87,350,000 



EIERA 



Z00J Annua f typort 



Project 



Location 



Amount Financed 



1982 


Associated Electric Coooerative Inc 


Thomas Hill 

1 1 Ivl 1 IUO 1 1 1 1 1 




71 000 000 




Associated Electric CooDerative Inc 


Thomas Hill 

1 1 Ivl 1 1 QO 1 1 1 1 1 




SO 000 000 

w'wjWWUjUww 




Associated Electric Cooperative, Inc. 


Thomas Hill 


$ 


73,000,000 




Associated Electric Cooperative, Inc. 


Thomas Hill 


$ 


12,000,000 




Noranda Aluminum, Inc. 


New Madrid 


$ 


45,000,000 




Union Electric Company 


St Louis 




20 000 000 




Monsanto Comoanv 


St Louis 


$ 


9 325 000 

W i Wt— W j w w w 




Associated Electric CooDerative Inc 

' lOuvvlUlvVJ L_lwwll Iw VuUUvl Ull v Vj II (v. 


Thomas Hill 

1 1 IWI 1 1 <_4. W 1 II 1 1 


S 


55 900 000 

WW, wV/ w , U w w 




Grant Anticipation Notes, 1982 


various locations 


S 


24,500,000 






TOTAL: 


$ 


360,725,000 


1983 


St . losenh I inht & Power ("iomnanv 


Kansas f^itv 

r\ui louo v/iiy 




<S fiOO 000 




Communitv Develooment Pronram 1983 


various municioalities 

vat iuuo 1 1 iui 1 1 wi|w^cii i uco 


$ 


1 8 000 000 




Grant Antirination Notes 1983 

\-A 1 Ul 11 / 1 1 IIIVjIIJUIIVI 1 1 HWLww, 1 \s\J\J 


various municioalities 

Vdl IWUO 1 1 IUI llwIfvVClll uuo 




44 1 00 000 

it 7 1 w , W w w 




Associated Electric Coooerativp Inc 


New Madrid 

new iviuui iu 




44 1 00 000 






TOTAL: 


$ 


111,800,000 


1984 


Union Electric Comoanv 

\*/ III \J I 1 I— 1 VvU 1 W X-/ \y 1 1 1 Iwr i-A 1 IV 


St Louis 




1 60 000 000 

1 w w , w w w ? w w \J 




Lone Star Industries, Inc. 


Cape Girardeau 




9,100,000 




Monsanto Company 


St Louis 




2 890 000 




Union Electric Comoanv 


St Louis 

\Jli ^wl*4lw 


$ 


47 500 000 

# ,wUw,www 




Associated Electric CooDerative Inc 

rivvvvlUlvV L_»|wwLI Iw V/wWL/ vl Ull V v j II IVi 


Thomas Hill 

1 1 IWI 1 IUO 1 1 1 1 1 




153 125 000 

1 v/V/| 1 t_wjwww 






TOTAL: 




372 615 000 


1985 


Union Electric Company 


St. Louis 


$ 


126,500,000 




Communitv Develooment Pronram 1 Q8S 

vvi i ii 1 1 u i iiiy i — ' K-r vuivyui i i&i ii i i vyi c*i i i , i w w v_> 


various municioalities 

V d 1 IV/UO 1 1 IUI llwl^CXIIllww 




1 5 000 000 




Grant Anticipation Notes, 1985 


various municipalities 


$ 


90,000,000 




Chrysler Corporation 


St. Louis 


$ 


16,000,000 




Mobay Chemical Corporation 


Kansas Citv 

i \wi i wUv-» vl I y 


$ 


1 600 000 




Revnolds Metal Comoanv 

i ivy i ivivw ivivitii \_/wi i iuui i y 


Kansas Citv 


4> 


750 000 

/ w w , w w w 






TOTAL: 


$ 


249,850,000 


1986 


Grant Anticioation Notes 1986 

\*A 1 Ul 1 L l \ 1 1 LI VI k/UUvl 1 1 * W Lu O , 1 \J\J\J 


various municioalities 

V \A 1 1 w KA O 1 1 IUI llvl CLI 1 11 w^ w 




65 000 000 

wwjWWWjWWW 






TOTAL: 


S 


65 000 000 


1988 


Community Development Note Program, 1988 


various municipalities 


S 


15,000,000 




Monsanto Comnanv 

1 VI \J\ IOGI 1 Lv wvi 1 1 [-'Oil i y 


St 1 nnis 




7 850 000 






TOTAL: 


$ 


22,850,000 


1989 


Grant Anticioation Notes 1989 


various municioalities 

VUI IWW.W 1 1 IUI Ilvlk/UIILIVW 




1 4 850 000 

1 ^,Uww,www 




St Joseoh Uaht & Power Comoanv 

\j i. uu u^ui i i — ly i il w* i uvvui will i y 


St Joseoh 


w 


5 600 000 






TOTAL: 


s 


20 450 000 


1990 


Union Electric Comoanv 

III \*F 1 1 L«_ 1 v Vl 1 1 W V-^ Vy 1 1 I L-S 1 ly 


St Louis 

V_SL. 1 — W W. 1 W 




60 000 000 

WWjWWWjWWU 






TOTAL: 




60 000 000 


1991 


City of Springfield 


Springfield 


$ 


32,650,000 




City of Lee's Summit 


Lee's Summit 


$ 


9,695,000 




Noranda Aluminum, Inc. 


New Madrid 


$ 


45,000,000 




Metropolitan Sewer District 


St. Louis 


$ 


68,000,000 




St. Louis County Water Company 


St. Louis 


$ 


25,000,000 




Missouri Cities Water Company 


various locations 


$ 


4,500,000 






TOTAL: 


S 


184,845,000 



Project 



Location 



Amount Financed 



1992 


Union Electric Company 


St. Louis 




$ 


42,685,000 




State Revolving Fund 


various locations 




$ 


13,550,000 




State Revolving Fund, MSD 


St. Louis 




$ 


85,000,000 




St Louis Countv Watpr ComDanv 


St. Louis 




$ 


25 000 000 




Ravtown Watpr Comnanv 

■ iuy lwvi i v ycllvi wv/i i iljcii ly 


Raytown 




$ 


3 000 000 




Tri-Countv Watpr Comnanv 

1 1 I UvUI 1 Ly ¥ ¥ Gllv I Wl 1 ILJCVl i y 


Jackson, Cass & Lafayette Cos. $ 


8 365 000 




Middlefork Water Comoanv 

iviiuuiwi vi i\ ww uw i wi i ivui i y 


Marwillp 
ivicu y vine 






2 000 000 




SRF Multiole ParticiDant 


Vd! lUUo IvJvGlUL/l lo 


TOTAL- 




48 295 000 

IV , L—\J\J , VVV 

227 895 000 


1993 


Kansas City Power & Light 


i\ul loao \jl Ly 






31,000,000 




Union Electric Company 


C+ 1 nnic 
OL. LUUlo 






47,500,000 




Missouri-Ampriran Watpr Comoanv 


St. Joseph 




$ 


5 000 000 




fit 1 oi ii<; f^nuntv Watpr nnmnanv 

01. L-uuio uuui iiy vvciiui wwi i il^cli iy 


St. Louis 




$ 


1 5 000 000 




Utilicorn Unitpd 

V-/ LI 1 1 VW 1 yj Ul 1 1 ICU 


Kansas City 




$ 


5 000 000 




Chrvsler Corooration 


OL LUUlo 






1 6 000 000 




Monsanto Comoanv 

iviwi iwui i lu vui i ik/tii iy 


fit 1 nniQ 

Ol. LUUlo 


TOTAL" 


$ 


1 4 520 000 
134 020 000 


1994 


SRF, Multiple Participant 


fitatPwiHp 






22,425,000 




Union Electric Company 


fit 1 ouis 

Ol. LUUIO 




s 


44,000,000 




Kansas Citv Powpr & Liaht 


Kan<5a^ Citv 

i\ui louo ony 






1 2 366 000 




Associated Elpctrir Co-od 


finrinnf ipIH 
olji ii iy i icmu 






27 375 000 




Emoire District Electric 

1— 1 1 IIJII V *mf 1 w L 1 IV/l 1— 1 V V 11 IV 


Springfield 




$ 


8 000 000 

UjVVUj Wv 




Metrooolitan Sewer District 

ivivii 1 1 mi i \»*v i¥wi imS lull iwi 


St. Louis 




$ 


50 000 000 




American Cvanamid 

/ V 1 1 1 VI 1 Vt-AI 1 W V LAI 1 tAI 1 li VJ 


St. Louis 


TOTAL- 


$ 
$ 


3 450 000 
167 616 000 


1995 


SRF Multiole ParticiDant 

\J I 11 j IVIUIllk/IV 1 Ul IIUIL/UI It 


various locations 

VUl IVUO (UVULIUI IO 




$ 


12 215 000 




SRF, Multiple Participant 


varinuc; InratinnQ 

V Cll f UUO IU vCl LILJl lO 






43,230,000 




SRF, Multiple Participant 


variniiQ Inratinn^ 

Vdl IUUO IUvuUUI 1 o 






30,000,000 




SRF, Multiple Participant 


various locations 




S 


17,450,000 




SRF Multiole ParticiDant 

VJ 1 11 j IVIUIUUIV 1 Ul HvlUUI IL 


various locations 




S 


1 1 463 000 




SRF Multiole ParticiDant 

ui ii j iviuniLyiv i ui nvii»/ui il 


various locations 




S 


1 8 000 000 




St Joseoh Liaht & Power 


fit Incpnh 
Ol. JUotJpi 1 






5 600 000 




St Louis Countv Water Comoanv 

\J V. V_V \A IO / VLJ Illy ¥ V ULv 1 \>/V>r 1 1 1 UUI 1 V 


Vul IIJUO lUl/CLUvl IO 






1 2 000 000 




St Joseoh Liaht & Power ('refund^ 

V_/ L > UUCfCiL/l 1 1 — 1 V 1 1 V V_A I v^ VV VI 11 UIUI lui 


fit JnQpnh 

Ol. UUoCpl 1 


TOTAL- 


c 


5 600 000 
155,558,000 


1996 


SRF, Multiple Participant 


Vul lUUo lUUallUI lO 




c 


26,410,000 




Assoriatpd Flprtrin Ooonprativp 


finrinnf iplrl 
yjyji ii iy iiciu 






127 41 S 000 




Henrv Countv Water 

I 1 V 1 ii y \*-/ \J \-A 1 ivy VVvdvl 


Hpnrv (Countv 
i ici ii y v/vjuiiiy 






13 000 000 




SRF Multiole ParticiDant 


various locations 




$ 


4 545 000 




SRF Multiole ParticiDant 

\J 1 II , IVIUIIIL/Iv I Ul VIVlVUI IV 


various locations 




$ 


14 185 000 




SRF Multiole ParticiDant 


various locations 


TOTAL: 


$ 
$ 


24 000 000 
209 555 000 


1997 


Missouri-American Water Comoanv 

1 V 1 1 V VV VJ 1 1 ' * 1 1 Ivl lUUI 1 ¥ ¥ ULv 1 \*r vl 1 1 k/UI 1 V 


various locations 




$ 


6 000 000 




St. Louis County Water Company 


various locations 




$ 


20,000,000 




SRF, Multiple Participant 


various locations 




$ 


23,600,000 




SRF, Multiple Participant 


various locations 




$ 


24,060,000 




SRF, Multiple Participant 


various locations 




$ 


15,785,000 




SRF, Multiple Participant 


various locations 




$ 


2,500,000 




SRF, Multiple Participant 


various locations 




$ 


22,235,000 




SRF, Multiple Participant 


various locations 




$ 


5,730,000 




Bayer Corporation (refund) 


Kansas City 


TOTAL: 


$ 
$ 


1 ,600,000 
121,510,000 



EIERA 



2007 Annua f ^Report 



Project 



Location 



Amount Financed 



1998 


SRF Multiole Particioant 


various locations 

VCll IUUO 1 Uv/U 1 1 W 1 IO 






14 015 000 

i *T,U 1 U,UUU 




Missouri-Amprioan Watpr Hnmnanv ^A^ 

IVMOOUUI 1 i\ 1 1 Id IUCII 1 V V CllO 1 VUI 1 IjJul ly I / V 1 


variniiQ InpptinnQ 

VCll IUUO lUUullUI IO 




<fc 

M> 


a con noo 




RRF Multinlp Particioant 

V— J 1 11 , IVIUIll^/lw T Gil UUIfJCll 11 


various InpatinnQ 

VCll IUUO lUUClllUI IO 




<£ 


1 fi 480 000 




St Louis Countv Water Comoanv (A\ 


various locations 

VCll IUUO 1 UV-fU IIUI IO 




$ 


000 000 








TOTAL: 


$ 


59 995 000 


1999 


AmerenUEfA^ 


various locations 

veil iuuo iuuciuui io 






60 000 000 
uu,uuu,uuu 




AmerenUE(B) 


various locations 




S 


50,000,000 




AmerenUE(C) 


various locations 




S 


50,000,000 




Missouri-American Water Comoanv (B^ 


various locations 

veil iuuo iuuciliui io 




$ 


1 q ooo onn 

1 c,uuu,uuu 




SRF Multiole ParticiDant 

KJI 11 , 1 V 1 U 1 LI k/1 1 CA.I UVIL/UI 1 L 


various locations 

VCll IUUO lUUClLtUI IO 






4^ Q00 000 

tJ,C7UU,UUU 




SRF Multiole ParticiDant 


various locations 

veil iuuo luucuiui io 






47 Q70 000 

i / , C7 / U,UUU 




Ravtown Water Comoanv 

i luy iv v v i i ¥ ¥ uivi kj i i i uj qa. i i y 


Ravtown 

i ioy iu vv 1 1 






2 fi70 000 

C-,KJ t U,UUU 




St 1 nni 4 ? Cinnntv W^tpr nnmnanu 
oil Lwuio vsuuiny vvaici v_/ui iiucii ly 


veil iuuo luociiiui io 






40 onn ooo 








TOTAL- 


$ 


315 540 000 


2000 


Tri-Oountv Water Authoritv 

i 1 1 uuui ny v v ci iu i rAuu iui ny 


various Inppitinn^ 

veil iuuo iuociiiui io 






1 4 7fi0 000 
1 *+, / uu,uuu 




SRF, Multiple Participant 


various locations 




S 


13,870,000 




AmerenUE(A) 


various locations 




S 


63,500,000 




AmerenUF^R^ 


various lopatinn^ 

vai iuuo iuuciiiui io 






000 000 




AmerenUF (G) 

ni i iui ci i \j i— y v> f 


various lopptinn^ 

veil iuuo iuuciiiui io 






fiO 000 000 




Missouri-American Water Comoanv 


various locations 

veil iuuo iuuciiiui io 






2Q 000 000 

£.C,UUU,UUU 




SRF Multiole Particioant 


various locations 

veil iuuo iuuciiiui io 






640 000 

vJiC , utu , uuu 




SRF, MSD-St. Louis (refund) 


various locations 




S 


72,545,000 








TOTAL: 


$ 


369,315,000 


2001 


SRF Multinle Particioant 

vl 11 , IVIUIUjJlC 1 CX 1 UUI|>JCU 11 


various location*? 

veil iuuo iuuciiiui io 






41 485 000 




Middlefork Water Comoanv 


various locations 

veil iuuo iuuciiiui io 






1 620 000 




SRF, Multiple Participant 


various locations 






1 3 930 000 




SRF, Multiple Participant 


various locations 




$ 


122,060,000 








TOTAL: 


$ 


179,095,000 


2002 


Missouri Energy Efficiency LL Program 


various locations 




$ 


4,910,000 




Missouri-American Water Company 


various locations 




$ 


15,000,000 




SRF, Multiple Participant 


various locations 




$ 


29,545,000 




SRF, Multiple Participant 


various locations 




$ 


112,410,000 








TOTAL: 


$ 


161,865,000 




Little Blue Valley Sewer District 


II lUtJptJI IUt?i lufci 




$ 


oo qi c nnn 
oo,c7 I o,uuu 




Cpr IWIiiltirtlo PorHrMnant 
Onr, IVIUILI|Jlfc? r ctlLIUipdl IL 


various locations 

VCll IUUO IUUCIIIUI IO 




$ 


1 0^ 065 000 




SRF, Multiple Participant 


various locations 




$ 


39,940,000 








TOTAL: 


$ 


231,920,000 


2004 


SRF, Multiple Participant (A)(refund) 


various locations 




$ 


77,625,000 




SRF, Multiple Participant (B) 


various locations 




$ 


179,780,000 




SRF, Multiple Participant (C) 


various locations 




$ 


27,895,000 








TOTAL: 


$ 


285,300,000 



2005 



Missouri Energy Efficiency LL Program 
SRF, Multiple Participant (A) 
SRF, Multiple Participant (C) 



various locations 
various locations 
various locations 



TOTAL: 



$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 



13,760,000 
53,060,000 
39,895,000 
106,715,000 



Project 



Location 



Amount Financed 



2006 


Missouri Energy Efficiency LL Program 


various locations 


$ 


14,813,137 




SRF, Multiple Participant (A) 


various locations 


$ 


87,505,000 




SRF, Multiple Participant (C) 


various locations 


$ 


85,210,000 






TOTAL: 


$ 


187,528,137 


2007 


Missouri-American Water Company 


various locations 


$ 


57,480,000 




SRF, Multiple Participant (A) 


various locations 


$ 


57,430,000 




SRF, Multiple Participant (B) 


various locations 


$ 


22,105,000 






TOTAL: 


$ 


137,015,000 




The Lewis and Clark State Of.ce Building, home of the Department of Natural Resources, is a beautiful 
structure. In 2005, DNR officials were awarded the Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design - 
LEEDS certification, platinum rating, the highest level possible. The 120,000 square-foot building has 
efficiency software, equipment and mechanical systems that will save the state approximately $85,000 to 
$92,000 a year in energy costs. The DNR facility is the only state building in Missouri with the LEEDS 
Platinum certification. 



EIERA 



ZOO J Annua f He^orf 



"Brownfiefds Loan "Program 



Brown.elds - Building Communities, Car eers and a Brighter Future 



Clarence Howard, 21, sits in his high school 
English class and dreams of owning a big company 
that specializes in concrete finishing and home 
renovation. Fellow classmate Dwayne Wy singer, 25, 
wants to be a carpenter and eventually own a home 
renovation company, like Clarence. 





Robert Randle, 19, watches closely as Clarence Howard, 21, 
hammers a stud in place before concrete is poured. Randle 
and Howard are enrolled in YouthBuild St. Louis with 20 other 
young men and women. They learn carpentry and building 
skills at construction sites, while attending high school to earn 
their GED. 



nnwersa, 



That is this week. Next week, Clarence and 
Dwayne will pick up their hammers, saws, power 
drills, and other equipment and head out to a 
worksite with 20 other young men and women in 
their class. They are building affordable housing 
units in St. Louis for low-income citizens. Next 
week? Back to the classroom and more reading, 
writing, and arithmetic. 

"This blend of academic and vocational activities 
is the framework of our program," said Joyce 
Sonn, executive director of YouthBuild St. Louis 
AmeriCorps (YBSLA). 'This program trains young 
men and women with a professional skill that will 
provide them with employment opportunities and a 
focused career path. Also, the students will earn a 
GED through completion of required courses." 

YouthBuild's sponsor, a community development 
organization called Youth Education Health in 
Soulard, is a partner with the Red Brick Community 
Land Trust in restoring a brow nfi el d site. Red 
Brick Community Land Trust is a non-profit 
organization that develops affordable housing 
and will employ YouthBuild students on future 
housing projects. Brownfields are underutilized 
buildings and properties that have great potential 
for redevelopment. But the properties have to be 
"cleaned up" (hazardous wastes, pollutants, etc.) 
to meet certain specifications as outlined by the 
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and 
the Missouri Department of Natural Resources' 
Brow nfi elds/Voluntary Cleanup Program. 

In 2006, the EIERA established the State's 
first revolving loan fund for Brownfields projects 
and received a $1 million grant from EPA to assist 
eligible applicants, particularly those projects in 
small and rural communities. In St. Louis, Red 
Brick Community Land Trust received $30,000 to 

( Continued on page 19) 

3972-2007 



ferownfiefds Loan "Program 



clean up a brown, eld and plans to build four , 
two-story units at the corner of Tucker and Soulard. 
Several years ago, a gasoline station operated at that 
one-acre site in St. Louis. 

'This is an excellent project," said Jerry Govero, 
chairman of the Authority. "We are teaching young 
people a skill, redeveloping brownfields sites and 
improving the community." 



In reference to the Brownfields Revolving Loan 
Fund, individuals, organizations, or municipalities 
can submit applications. There is no annual deadline 
for applications, but applicants must be approved to 
receive financial assistance. For more information 
about the loan program or receive an application, 
please call (573) 751-4919 or fax a letter to EIERA 
at (573) 635-3486. 




EIERA board member Robt Kramer discusses clean up efforts 
and construction plans for the proposed housing units with Karen 
Massey, deputy director, and Kristin Allan-Tipton, development 
director. A few years ago, the area they are standing on was 
occupied by a gasoline station with .ve underground storage 
tanks. 



The honorable Maida Coleman, Missouri State Senator, and 
Dr. Sarah Coffin, board chairperson of the Red Brick Community 
Land Trust participate in the check presentation at a St. Louis 
brownfields site. The EIERA awarded $30,000 to the Red Brick 
Community Land Trust to clean up the site, which will allow 
construction of affordable housing. 



ds 
ck 

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EIERA 



ZOO J Annua f He^orf 



Summary of "Bond issuances 



Annual and Cumulative Totals, 1973-2007 



($ Billions) 

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□ Cumulative Totals 
■ Annual Figures 



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Summary of "Bond issuances 




EIERA 



2007 Annua f Heport 



Tzmrjij Loan "Program 



Reading, Riding and Arithmetic... 



In 1913, there was a magnificent show palace in 
Lee's Summit where beautiful, proud horses pranced 
and strutted in an arena to win awards and trophies. 

Today, the sights and sounds are much different. 
Basketballs bounce on the gym floor, colorful and 
fancy tennis shoes squeak with every twist and turn 
and children laugh and scream with joy. Above the 
noise of bouncing basketballs and squeaking shoes, 
teachers and coaches yell words of encouragement 
and instruction. What happened? 

In the early 1900s, lumber baron R.A. Long 
constructed the Longview Show Horse Arena on a 
1,700-acre country estate 
called Longview Farm. 
The estate included the 
horse arena, a 48-room 
mansion and 40 other 
structures. The large horse 
arena was designed to train 
and promote sleek show 
horses in a competitive 
setting. Revelation, whose 
picture is still prominently 
displayed today on 
walls and in hallways, 
was probably the most 
decorated horse that the 
farm produced. 



the National Register of Historic Places, into a 
commercial enterprise. Today that enterprise includes 
1,100 homes and 600,000 square feet of office and 
retail space. About the same time, city and school 
officials began to restore the historic horse arena 
which today is the $13.2 million Longview Farm 
Elementary School which boasts 50 classrooms, a 
library, and offices for staff. The renovated 150-stall 
horse arena is now a 90-foot basketball court and 
gymnasium for the school's 646 students. 

An important contribution in the restoration of 
the horse arena was a $2.1 million low-cost loan 

( Continued on page 23) 



In 2001, city officials 
and community and 
business leaders began to 
transform the landmark 
farm, which is listed on 




In 2001, community leaders began to transform the 1, 700-acre Longview Farm into a commercial 
and residential complex. Additionally, the historic Longview Horse Arena was renovated and 
of.cials built the $13.2 million Longview Farm Elementary School. 



*fith Anniverm 



3972-2007 



Tzmrcjij Loan IProcjmm 




Ofcials received a $2.1 million loan from the Missouri Energy Efficiency Leveraged Loan Program to install high 
efficiency condensation boilers, AC units, and 145 high efficiency motion sensor lights in the gymnasium, cafeteria and 
classrooms. During the restoration, the 150-stall horse arena (above, left) was converted into a 90-foot basketball court 
and gymnasium (above, right). 



from the Missouri Energy Ef.ciency Leveraged Loan 
Fund administered by EIERA. School officials used 
the loan to install two high-efficiency condensation 
boilers, AC units with co2 sensors, 145 T-5 high 
efficiency motion sensor lights in the gym, cafeteria, 
classrooms, and a Building Energy Management 
System. 

"The loan was a tremendous help and state 
officials were very supportive," said Dr. Ryan 
Rostine, the school's principal. "It was a key factor 
in the process that transformed the horse barn into an 
attractive and functional educational facility that the 
community leaders are proud to have in our rapidly 
growing school district." 

The state loan program provides low-cost loan 
assistance to local governments and school districts. 
The purpose is to encourage the installation of 
energy-efficient lights, street lights and other energy 



conservation equipment for schools and public 
buildings. 

"These efforts to restore these beautiful buildings 
rather than tear them down are a tribute to local 
leaders who promote sustainable communities," said 
Deron Cherry, treasurer of the Authority. "Also, with 
the energy improvements school officials will realize 
more than $78,000 in energy savings (annually)." 

Nationally, Missouri is the first state to administer 
this type of program. Since 2000, when the Missouri 
Energy Efficiency Leveraged Loan Program was 
established, $26.4 million has been loaned to more 
than 70 public school projects and $6.5 million has 
been loaned to 15 local governments. 

The EIERA bonds, which are issued to support the 
loans, have $7.4 million in reserve which provides 
the loan subsidy and security against any potential 

( Continued on page 24) 



EIERA 



ZOO J Annua f He^orf 



Tzmrcjij Loan Program 



deficient loan payments. The participants will 
repay the loans in specified payments not to 
exceed a 16-year period. Historically, the loan 
program has held an Aa2 rating, which is one of 
the highest ratings available. Moody's Investor 
Service, a ratings fi rm based in New York, 
assigned the rating. The ratings reflect the size, 
security and participants in the loan program 
and the high quality of the EIERA-issued bonds 
in the financial market. 

To obtain more information about the 
Missouri Energy Efficiency Leveraged Loan 
Program, please contact the Energy Center at 
(573) 751-7466. 



'These efforts to restore 
these beautiful buildings 
rather than tear them down 
are a tribute to local leaders 
who promote sustainable 
communities." 

-Devon Cherry 
Treasurer of the Authority 




In addition to being a beautiful facility, Longview Farm Elementary School is a model of historic 
preservation. The school has won several awards including the 2007 Preservation Award presented by the 
prestigious Historic Kansas City Foundation, and was recognized by the Urban Land Institute with the 
Excellence in Development Award. 



*fith Anniverm 



3972-2007 



Community Service 



In 2006, the Authority provided $50,000 
to the Kansas City By-Products Synergy 
Group. This Kansas City-based 
organization attempts to match companies 
with raw materials on site with other 
businesses seeking raw materials for their 
manufacturing process. This partnership 
has saved companies thousands of 
dollars in disposal fees and recovered 
tons of raw materials that might have 
been trucked to a local landfill. Lafarge, 
just east of Kansas City, in Sugar Creek, 
was instrumental in the formation of 
the Kansas City By-Products Synergy 
G roup. This seven-story structure (right) 
towers over the 1,100-acre site where the 
company produces approximately one 
million tons of cement a year for concrete 
customers in Kansas City and throughout 
the M idwest. In terms of resource recovery, 
since 2005, Lafarge has tapped methane 
gas from two nearby landfills to generate 
seven percent of the company's energy 
needs. Also, the company has developed 
a new facility to receive waste paper, 
cardboard, plastic, wood, and textiles 
from Kansas City companies as another 
alternate fuel source. Last year, Lafarge 
received 124,000 tons of coal ash from 
Kansas City Power and Light that is 
used as a raw material in the cement 
production process. 




Missouri Department of Natural Resources 



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EIERA 



"Providing a vision and resources to address the challenges of our environment. 
State Environmental Improvement and Energy Resources Authority 

1972-2007